Starting a Garden Part 2

Instructions for starting a garden part 2

Step 4

bell-pepper
bell-pepper

Choose crops that require less room if you have a small vegetable garden or grow vegetables in a container. Lettuce is a great pot plant, and ‘Patio’ or ‘Tumbler’ tomatoes will grow well in a hanging basket. Plants that climb and vine, such as cucumbers and pole beans, can be trained up a trellis to take up less room horizontally.

Step 5

Schedule plantings around the two main growing seasons which vary by region: cool (spring and fall) and warm (summer). Common cool-season vegetables include beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, peas, potatoes, radishes, spinach and turnips. Warm-season crops include beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, melons, peppers, pumpkins, squash and tomatoes.

Step 6

flat of seeds

flat of seeds

Sow some seeds directly in the ground as they grow best that way: beans, beets, carrots, chard, corn, lettuce, melons, peas, pumpkins, squash and turnips. Starting seeds is, of course, much less expensive than planting seedlings sold in flats, packs and pots.

Stay tuned for more tips!

Starting a Garden Part 1

Many have not enjoyed the benefits of eating vegetables right out of the garden. Not mass produced and weak, but the real stuff, full of flavor and nature! If you are like me, there is no other way. The next several entries will be all about making your home garden the best and most productive for your family!

Instructions for starting a garden part 1

  1. Step 1

    Lettuce Garden

    Lettuce Garden

Grow only those vegetables you enjoy eating. Give priority to those prized for incredible flavor when eaten fresh from the garden: sweet corn, beans and peas, tomatoes and young spinach, among others.

  1. Step 2

Prepare a plot of flat ground that gets full sun nearly all day. Break up and turn the soil and add compost or other organic material (See How to Buy Soil Amendments). A full day of blazing sunshine is especially important if you grow vegetables in the cool weather of early spring, early fall or winter.

  1. Step 3

Figure out how much growing space you have and plant accordingly. Lettuce, for example, can be grown in a solid mat, but tomatoes need to be spaced about 2 feet (60 cm) apart.

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Give pumpkins at least 4 feet (120 cm) of growing room. Growing requirements are provided on seed packets, in catalogs, and on nursery tags, as well as in books on growing vegetables.

Check back later for more steps!

Read more: How to Start a Vegetable Garden | eHow.com

Thanks eHow!